setbabiesonfire
metatronstube:

Modern science never frames the questions, how did delusion come into the world? Or Imagination? Or Willpower? But to the ancients, delusion, imagination and will were among the greatest forces in the universe, living out there in three-dimensional space as well as in our own minds. For them, the history of creation was an account of how these things came to be.
Friedrich Nietzsche said, "Unless you have chaos inside you, you cannot give birth to a dancing star." Humans would never have been able to become freely creative, brave or loving if they had not been able to make mistakes, to see things as other than they are, and to believe things to be other than they are. Because of Lucifer, it is the case that we do not always believe in proportion to the evidence. We can often believe what we want to believe. For instance, the life of someone we know can appear a miserable failure or a heart-warming success depending on how we choose to look at it, whether good-heartedly or mean spiritedly. And when the harsh fire, the primeval sulfur burns in the pit of our stomachs, it is difficult for us to be good-hearted.”

—Mark Booth, “The Secret History of the World”

metatronstube:

Modern science never frames the questions, how did delusion come into the world? Or Imagination? Or Willpower? But to the ancients, delusion, imagination and will were among the greatest forces in the universe, living out there in three-dimensional space as well as in our own minds. For them, the history of creation was an account of how these things came to be.

Friedrich Nietzsche said, "Unless you have chaos inside you, you cannot give birth to a dancing star." Humans would never have been able to become freely creative, brave or loving if they had not been able to make mistakes, to see things as other than they are, and to believe things to be other than they are. Because of Lucifer, it is the case that we do not always believe in proportion to the evidence. We can often believe what we want to believe. For instance, the life of someone we know can appear a miserable failure or a heart-warming success depending on how we choose to look at it, whether good-heartedly or mean spiritedly. And when the harsh fire, the primeval sulfur burns in the pit of our stomachs, it is difficult for us to be good-hearted.”

—Mark Booth, “The Secret History of the World